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Dirty Tricks: Senate Given 42,000 Pages of Additional Documents Only Hours Before Kavanaugh's Confirmation Hearing
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Dirty Tricks: Senate Given 42,000 Pages of Additional Documents Only Hours Before Kavanaugh's Confirmation Hearing

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WASHINGTON, DC – September 4, 2018

Institutional games to fix Trumps’ wagon continue. Democrats attack positions of conservatives on all directions, however, so far without special success. The fight for appointment in the Supreme Court is one of the key battlefields for many liberals. Trump’s choice to replace Kennedy — a swing vote on the nine-member court — has the potential to remake the court for a generation as part of precedent-shattering decisions on abortion, health care, gay marriage and other issues. Recognizing the stakes, many Democrats have lined up in opposition to any Trump pick, and Republicans lawmakers and activists are seeking to shape the president’s decision. But they feel they are losing it, and can do nothing with it. However, according to ancient bureaucratic wisdom, any, even the best, law can be buried by bureaucratic procedures. And they obviously intend to employ this tactic.

Hours before the start of hearings on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, the lawyer for former president George W. Bush turned over 42,000 pages of documents from the nominee’s service in the Bush White House, angering Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, who issued what is certain to be a futile call to delay the proceedings.

Taylor Foy, a spokesman for Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), responded that “our review team will be able to complete its examination of this latest batch in short order, before tomorrow’s hearing begins.”

The hearings are scheduled for 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, with opening statements by committee members. No information was released on the subject matter of the documents, and Bush’s lawyer asked that they be kept from the public, made available only to committee members and staff.

The hearings are expected to last four days, so staffers and members will have more than a few hours to review the documents before any vote is taken on sending the nomination to the full Senate.

Author: USA Really