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Montanan Sent to Prison for Watching Child Porn on a Bus
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Montanan Sent to Prison for Watching Child Porn on a Bus

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U.S. District Court in Missoula

HELENA – October 10, 2018

A man who committed a despicable act of moral decay and violation of social norms in Montana last summer has found himself facing a prison sentence. As local media report, a 66-year-old resident, Eric Franklin Rosser, was caught watching child pornography on a bus.

His case was only heard now, in the middle of October, but he was found guilty by the U.S. District Court in Missoula yesterday. Rosser’s sentencing has been set for January 17.

What is even more interesting, Rosser not only watched the abusive and illegal materials on the web via his laptop in July 2017, but was also on his way to Washington with $10,000 strapped to each of his legs. What is even worse—Rosser knew he was doing wrong and that he is ill, as, according to court documents, when he was approached by another passenger, he allegedly said, “Leave me alone. I know I have a problem.”

After that the fellow passenger called Billings’ police to the bus station when they arrived, and Rosser admitted to looking at images of young girls engaging in sexually explicit conduct.

Rosser, who has a really “dirty” criminal record, later admitted to violating his probation conditions and fleeing federal supervision in the state of Washington, according to court documents. Explaining the thousands of dollars strapped to his legs, Rosser said he actually emptied his bank account and fled, simply because he didn’t want to go back to prison.

Rosser first came into the police’s line of visvion back in the early 2000s for similar crimes committed, however, though he posed a visible threat to society, he managed to remain free, which surely was a misjudgment on the part of both local and federal law enforcement.

Child pornography is illegal under federal law and in all states and is punishable by up to 20 years imprisonment or fine of $5,000 depending on the degree of the crime committed. The Supreme Court of the United States has found child pornography to be “legally obscene,” which is a term that refers to offensive or violent forms of pornography that have been declared to be outside the protections of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

According to the most recent data provided, for the decade from 2004 till 2013 the number of people persecuted for “commercial sexual exploitation of children” across the country was 37,000. 72% of the felons were accused of possession of inappropriate and illegal materials, 18% were involved in child sex trafficking, while 10 % were sent to prison for the production of child pornography.

The vast majority of the felons were male (97%), among whom no less than 82% were white. Most of the suspects, according to the study, weren’t married (70%) and had no prior felony convictions (79%).

Rosser’s case serves as a good example of the child pornography problem society has to tackle in the U.S.

Author: USA Really