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November 27th: The Battle of Mine Run Is Fought, Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood Shooting and Other Events of the Date
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November 27th: The Battle of Mine Run Is Fought, Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood Shooting and Other Events of the Date

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wikipedia.org

A number of important events have taken place on November 27th in U.S. history. Here is our take on the most interesting and valuable of them.

1863 – American Civil War: Mine Run Campaign: Battle of Mine Run

This battle, which is also known either as Payne's Farm, or New Hope Church, or the Mine Run Campaign (took place between November 27th and December 2, 1863), was conducted in Orange County, Virginia, during the American Civil War, and thus – was fought on one of the main battlefields of the Civil War.

Speed had escaped Union General Meade, who was furious with French, and this allowed prominent Southern General Lee time to react. Lee, in his turn, ordered Major General Jubal A. Early to march east on the Orange Turnpike. Brigadier General Joseph B. Carr's division of French's corps attacked twice. Major Gen. Edward "Allegheny" Johnson's Confederate division counterattacked, but was scattered by heavy fire and broken terrain.

The result of the battle was not clear, since both sides eventually claimed victory yet the Union lost almost twice as many warriors as the Confederates: 1272 of them were killed, whilst the Southern side only lost about 680.

1868 – Indian Wars: Comanche Campaign: the Battle of Washita River

This battle is also sometimes called the Battle of the Washita or even the Washita Massacre by some historians. It occurred on November 27, 1868 as Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer’s 7th U.S. Cavalry attacked Black Kettle’s Southern Cheyenne camp on the Washita River (located near the present-day town of Cheyenne, Oklahoma).

We have all the rights to call this a massacre, since those Native Americans of Oklahoma, who inhabited that particular camp, didn’t want the war against “white men” at all: they were the most isolated band of a major winter encampment along the river of numerous Native American tribal bands, totaling thousands of people. Yet, Custer's forces attacked their village because scouts had followed the trail of a party that had raided white settlers and passed through it.

What a ridiculous and tragic decision it was! Chief Black Kettle and his people had been at peace with the white settlers of the area. Custer's soldiers killed women and children in addition to warriors, although they also took many captive to serve as hostages and human shields. By the definitions of our present era that’d be considered a true war crime. The number of Cheyenne killed in the attack has been disputed since the first reports. The most moderate estimate states that about a hundred Native Americans were killed during this raid, while the U.S. side only lost 21 killed and 13 wounded.

2015 - Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood shooting

Exactly three years ago a tragedy happened in Colorado, when a mass shooting occurred in a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs. The shooting resulted in the deaths of three people and injuries to nine, as a police officer and two civilians were killed along with five police officers and four civilians injured.

The attacker, Robert Lewis Dear Jr., was taken into custody and charged three days later with first-degree murder and ordered held without bond. He called himself “a warrior for the babies” and insisted the system of Planned Parenthood shouldn’t exist in the U.S.

As loud statements on controversial issues were heard, the shooting in Colorado Springs drew comments from the anti-abortion and abortion-rights movements, as well as political leaders and initiated another wave of discussion on this topic. For example, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper stated the shooting was "a form of terrorism" and added that both this and other violent incidents of this nature could be the result of the "inflammatory rhetoric we see on all levels”.

These are the most notable events in U.S. history that occurred on November 27th, at least in our view.

Author: USA Really