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Kansas Bill Proposes Changing Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day
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Kansas Bill Proposes Changing Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day

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At the new session in the Kansas Legislature starting next week lawmakers will discuss one of this year’s holidays. Actually, they’re talking about what to call it. A Kansas bill seeks to join six other states in renaming Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day in an attempt to virtue signal to the Left.

The move to rename Columbus Day goes back to 1977’s United Nations International Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations in the Americas.

According to the Smithsonian, naming the holiday for Christopher Columbus ignores what happened after his arrival, millions of native deaths, forced slavery, and cultural colonization across the Americas.

Two Kansas legislatures have pre-filed a bill to change the name of Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day. The bill – proposed by representatives Dennis Highberger, (D) Lawrence, and Ponka-We Victors, (D) Wichita, the only Native American in the Kansas legislature – states Kansas recognizes that it was “first inhabited by the indigenous peoples of this region, including the Kanza and Osage peoples.”

Unhappy with merely adding a day celebrating the Native American Tribes of Kansas, the bill would strike Columbus Day from the record, and replace it with the new holiday.

According to the text of the bill, Kansas would join Alaska, Hawaii, South Dakota, Vermont, and “a growing number of cities” if it makes the decision to erase Columbus Day from history.

Ironically, the bill would also remove Native American Day, an existing Kansas holiday celebrated on the fourth Saturday of September in the state since 1945, from the list of state recognized holidays.

To date, six states have already renamed the second Monday in October Indigenous Peoples Day. South Dakota was the first in 1990, followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Vermont. 

Of course, filing the bill is just the first step. It could be months before we know if it goes anywhere.

Author: USA Really