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Australian soldiers planted the same AK-47 to two different executed civilians in Afghanistan as evidence of involvement in the Taliban
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Australian soldiers planted the same AK-47 to two different executed civilians in Afghanistan as evidence of involvement in the Taliban

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Illegal and brutal executions of civilians in Afghanistan attracted international attention after evidence of the fabrication of grounds for mass executions surfaced.

According to Shina's ABC Investigations, it turned out that the main evidence that supposedly forced the SAS to kill three unarmed farmers was the AK-47 with teal colored tape on the stock.

A special operation involving Australian soldiers was carried out in 2012. According to eyewitnesses, the Black Hawk helicopters landed near the house of the first victim. A few masked soldiers got off the side and ordered 80-year-old Abdul Wahid along with another elder, Mr Aminullah to come closer. When the locals complied with the order, the soldiers shot both of them. Wahid and Mr Aminullah were unarmed.

"They were together at the time when they went towards them … and they shot [my father]," Abdul Wali said.

The third victim of this raid was a 20-year-old shepherd, Jan Mohammad, who was trying to catch a cow frightened by helicopters. According to official information, Mohammad received one shot in the head and evidence of involvement in the Taliban was photographed right next to his body.

ABC Investigations can confirm that the body of Jan Mohammad was one of two photographed with the same AK-47 with teal coloured tape on the stock,” says the ABC article. “The third Afghan killed in the SAS raid was the imam of the local mosque, Muhibullah.”

 

"I want [the Australians] to be tried," said Shina farmer Sakhi Daad, who was witness of murders. "If the government cares about us, if they care about our widows and orphans, then they must summon them and try them in the court."

For the Australian secret services, such executions are common, they said, "that happened on numerous occasions."

"Often people who had been killed had weapons placed on them and [they were] photographed with these weapons," said an SAS patrol member who served on that special forces rotation of Afghanistan.

An Australian Defence Force spokesperson said: "It is not appropriate for Defence to comment on matters that may or may not be the subject of the Afghanistan Inquiry."

Author: Usa Really