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One Person Dead After Eating Salmonella-infected Honey Smacks
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One Person Dead After Eating Salmonella-infected Honey Smacks

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ATLANTA, GA — July 17, 2018

A homeless man has died after eating a box of salmonella-infected Kellog's Honey Smacks cereal. Other details remain unclear.

Earlier, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that a salmonella outbreak has infected 100 people in 33 states.

The agency announced Thursday that it has found salmonella in samples of Honey Smacks, which has been subject to a voluntary recall by Kellogg since mid-June.

Kellogg's is a cookie, cracker and cereal manufacturing company.

"Do not eat this cereal," the CDC tweeted.

Last month, Kellogg’s announced a recall of the cereal. No other Kellogg products are impacted by the recall.

The CDC also advised consumers should not eat any size package of Honey Smacks cereal or with any "best if used by" date. The announcement focused on 15.3-ounce and 23-ounce boxes with best-if-used-by dates from June 14, 2018, through June 14, 2019.

Kellogg's has promised to reimburse customers who sent in boxes of Honey Smacks that they've purchased.

The CDC is now promising to conduct a full investigation of the product. Also, after being informed about the reported illnesses by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the Food & Drug Administration, Kellogg launched their own investigation with the third-party manufacturer that produces Honey Smacks.

Honey Smacks are distributed across the U.S. with limited distribution in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, the Caribbean, Guam, Tahiti and Saipan.

One Person Dead After Eating Salmonella-infected Honey Smacks

The CDC warns that use or consumption of products contaminated with salmonella can result in serious illness, including fatal infections, fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and even death.

However, the impact of salmonella depends largely on the health and living conditions of individuals. Healthy individuals typically recover in four to seven days with treatment.

Author: USA Really